We're accountable for our own destiny

We actually have the power to set our own destiny. While we can’t control all the external forces, we can choose how to respond to them.  Do we see what life offers as lacking?  Or do we see the opportunities to learn, grow and be who we are meant to be?
 
Instead, we too often give up our power to choose.  We can choose to be happy and see life full and abundant, or we can be fearful and choose despair and distrust…a life full of wanting.
 
Ever wonder how a poor person has the energy to greet the world with a smile? Ever notice someone who has been the victim of violence find a way to forgive? What about the colleague who deals with a tough personality or a daunting project - everyday - and yet meets his/her work with joy?

The questions we should be asking ourselves are:  

  • How do I hold myself accountable to intentional engagement with the world around me?   

  • What is life offering me?  

  • What wonders might be lying at my feet if I only look and listen?  

We only need to awaken to possibility and embrace the abundance of what life offers.

So how do we create a prosperity of the heart?  How do we hold ourselves accountable to creating our own destiny?  

Neuroscience research breakthroughs show how the brain can fuel a healthier view of ourselves in the world.  Very simply…to take control of our destiny, we need to change our thoughts.  We need to own them deeply and create a new habit of believing in possibilities.

If we change our thoughts, we change how we feel, which also changes our behavior.  And if we change our behavior – or our perspectives of the world shift – we change the outcomes. We take control of our lives and how we choose to live.

Practical steps?

  1. Pick an issue or idea you’re struggling with.  Write down the thought.  Say it out loud.   Make it real.  How do you feel?  Think about how you behave when it sneaks up on you. How do you see the world through the lens of this thought?

  2. Change the thought.  What’s the opposite of what you’re thinking now?  How can you adjust it so it shifts your feelings about the issue? 

  3. Once you have an alternative thought, write that new thought down.  And say it out loud.  Again - make it real.  Every time you have the original thought that betrays you, work to catch yourself and pivot to the new one.  You can make a game of it.  When you catch yourself, give yourself credit. Have fun with the game.  While the goal here is to change your thought, you have to increase your awareness each time the old habit sneaks in.  That’s half the battle.

  4. How are you behaving with this new thought and the new feelings?  What’s changing with the outcome? 

  5. Practice this for at least 6-weeks – the time it takes to create a new habit.

And let me know how this new approach worked for you or forward your questions to michelle@michellesherbun.com.